Your UC retirement income
just might surprise you

When you retire, just about everything in your life changes—from your daily routine to your finances. Instead of receiving a paycheck from UC, you’ll be creating your own paycheck from the money you’ve saved over your working years, as well as other sources, such as the UC Retirement Plan (UCRP) or Social Security. If you’re a long-time UC employee, you might find that your potential retirement income from the UCRP is not that different from your current take-home pay.

Let’s consider three examples.

1. MEET HARU

Haru is a staff member with 30 years of service credit, planning to retire at age 60. Haru  earned an average of $60,000 annually in the last three years, with a monthly gross salary from UC of $5,000. We assume that Haru is married, files jointly, and claims one tax allowance.

In retirement, the monthly take-home income is slightly less than Haru's working paycheck. But in addition, Haru will have the UC Retirement Savings Program (UCRSP) account balances, CAP (capital accumulation payment) balance, and, once Haru reaches age 67, Social Security benefits.

Meet Haru

2. MEET AFTAN

Aftan began a second career with UC more than a decade ago, and is planning to retire at age 60. Over the last three years, Aftan earned an average of $75,000 annually, and has 12 years of service credit. Aftan's monthly gross salary from UC is $6,250. For purposes of this example,  we assume that Aftan has a registered domestic partner and claims one tax allowance.

In retirement, the monthly take-home income is less than one-third of Aftan's working paycheck; however, it will include the UCRSP account balances, 401(k) savings and pension benefits from previous employers, and Social Security benefits.

Meet Aftan

3. MEET REYES

Reyes joined UC in 1974 and is not coordinated with Social Security or Medicare. Reyes earned an average of $188,000 annually the last three years, and at retirement at age 65, Reyes will  have 40 years of service credit. Reyes' monthly gross salary from UC is $15,666, and we assume that Reyes is married, files jointly, and claims one tax allowance.

In retirement, the monthly take-home income is more than Reyes' working paycheck. In addition, Reyes will have the UCRSP account balances and the balance in the CAP.

Meet Reyes


How to Estimate Your Own Retirement Income

To estimate your own retirement income, check your Retirement Review, which shows an estimate of your UCRP pension benefit, plus an estimate of your accounts in the 403(b), 457(b), and DC Plans, assuming you retire at age 65.

If you are not eligible for UCRP, the site can estimate your retirement income at age 65 once you enter your annual pay. You may find that you’re on track to have what you need. If not, you may have other sources of income that can make up the difference, such as a previous employer’s plan and Social Security. Also consider ramping up your voluntary contributions to the 403(b) and/or 457(b) Plans.

  • Find your Retirement Review. Log in to view your Retirement Review.
  • Get help estimating your retirement income. Call 1-800-558-9182 to talk to a UC-dedicated Fidelity Workplace Financial Consultant over the phone.